Dangers Of IV Glucose Drips

By | 2016-10-28T11:20:13+00:00 May 1st, 2015|Medical Malpractice|

Individuals who seek out medical care do so because they believe the doctors and nursing providing that care are meeting their needs through scientifically-proven and FDA-approved methods and techniques. Unfortunately, there are some situations in which poor medical practice and dangerous drugs or treatments can lead to long term, devastating outcomes. One example of this is the use of IV glucose drips, a practice that is somewhat common in Asian immigrant communities. How can something like this be ineffective and, even worse, dangerous?

Close-up of a Petri dish preparation

Who Is Using IV Glucose Drips?

Ms. Myung Hwa Jang is an Asian immigrant who, due to an infection that coursed through her body, lost her legs below the knees, her right arm, and most of her left hand all because of the use of an IV glucose drip. Many people in the Asian community in the Flushing, Queens area are using this glucose (sugar) drip as a way of getting an instant pick-me-up. Government agencies have warned about using these products, which are available in storefront windows and behind closed doors.

Ms. Jang is a good example of why using medically approved treatments and products is necessary. She didn’t know, when she visited the location in February of 2013 and paid $70 for the treatment that she would later be in an ambulance on her way to the emergency room in septic shock. It would take her two years and treatment both in the United States and in Korea, before she would regain some of her health and her ability to walk using artificial limbs.

Fighting For Her Losses

In an effort to restore some quality of life, Ms. Jang is forced to learn new ways to do daily chores. Her life is altered significantly and this has led to countless struggles for the woman. As a result, she has filed a lawsuit in the State Supreme Court in Queens. She names Liang’s Medical Office, George Mang (a doctor at the clinic), New York Hospital Queens, and several doctors at the hospital in her lawsuit. A doctor at the clinic was never seen when she visited and, instead, a staff person used a ringer (which is the common term for the IV glucose drip she was given). She was also misdiagnosed at the hospital when she arrived.

Why Are People Using Glucose?

It’s important to note that the practice of using IV glucose drips is not recommended for use in this manner. Doctors have warned many Asian immigrants in the New York area that there are dangers to using a ringer and that the injections are no different from drinking surgery water. However, older generations especially use the IV solution. This may stem from the use of this method as a way to cure colds, fevers, and upset stomachs. When the individual cannot get this type of treatment in the U.S. many resort to treatments performed at home using needles and bags of glucose purchased at some pharmacies under the table. This is an illegal practice.

As for Ms. Jang, her case is pending. She also wants to educate people in Korea about the overuse of glucose in this form, though she still believes the treatment can offer cures, go here for correct usage information. Her husband has even had the treatments several times because he needed energy. She warns that people should not use this treatment unless absolutely necessary.

The use of the ringer is not recommended to anyone. The hospital cannot comment on the case and Dr. Mang, from the clinic, stated he was not at the clinic on the day she arrived and, therefore, did not approve the treatment.

Is This Medical Malpractice?

In all cases, individuals facing medical malpractice should work closely with an attorney to recoup losses from such cases whenever possible. It is not clear if medical malpractice took place here, but it is important for individuals to seek out well-qualified doctors and medical facilities prior to receiving any type of care.

About the Author:

Laurence P. Banville is the managing partner of Banville Law. As an experienced personal injury attorney, Mr. Banville helps clients recover compensation from those responsible for his clients' injuries. Our firm is located in New York City, serving clients from the five boroughs: Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, The Bronx, and Staten Island.

Leave A Comment